Sleep may help prevent gestational diabetes

Sleep may help prevent gestational diabetes

posted: October 22, 2017, 9:25 pm

Researchers in Chicago examined statistics from 8 studies on sleep length and gestational diabetes between over 17,000 pregnant women. Information was got by them from 4 studies which quantified sleep and blood glucose levels with diabetes in almost 300 women.

A few of the studies utilized an electronic apparatus to measure the girls slept. Others relied to report their sleep length themselves. Either way, the result was similar: girls who slept less than about 6 hours per night had a 2 to 3 times greater risk of developing gestational diabetes than women who slept longer.

Gestational diabetes develops throughout pregnancy and causes blood glucose levels to become too high. It affects between 5 and 10 per cent of women. It needs to be recognized and treated quickly to avoid health problems for both mother and baby.

Pregnant-woman-trying-to-sleep

The study does not demonstrate that diabetes is caused by lack of sleep, just that there is an association between both.

What accounts for the connection is not apparent. The study authors said it could be related to pregnancy hormone fluctuations combined with inflammation in the body brought on by lack of sleep, which could lead to insulin resistance and glucose levels.

How much sleep do you get? Is the recommended 7 to 9 hours sensible for you?

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